Jeff Lybarger's Song OF The Day

Subj: Song of the day XLVI
Date: 97-04-10 03:14:43 EDT
From: OUTRIDERJL@aol.com (Jeff Lybarger)
Sender: zeppelin-l@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU (DIGITAL GRAFFITI)
Reply-to: OUTRIDERJL@aol.com
To: ZEPPELIN-L@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU

Good evening! Wow, we finally made it, one more day till Zepfest! Well for those of us arriving early anyway. So let's jump right into the song of the day. Perhaps not regarded as one of Zeppelin's greatest achievements, but for me this song always brings a smile. It conjurs up images of good times and warm days, so with that thought in mind, let's enter In Through The Out Door, and take a trip back to track two, clocking in at 4:11, "South Bound Saurez".

A rollicking piano courtesy of John Paul Jones rings this track in. Up tempo and boogie woogie filled, Page joins in with stabbing riffs on the Gibson, and Bonzo keeps things steady with his usual flair and a constant hi-hat. There is a light-heartedness to this track, which is really a welcome breather after the very *thick* "In The Evening". The groove and the feel good vibes are felt in Robert's lyrics as well, as he embellishes' on one of his favourite topics: The Chase.

      "Baby, when you walk that sweet walk,
       oh you walk it good, yes you walk it good...
       Baby, when you talk that sweet talk,
       it sounds so good, oh so good...

       With a little bit of, o' concentration,
       and a little bit of helping hands, yeah
       and a little bit of, raving madness, hey
       you know it makes me feel baby,
       both my feet are back on the gound..."

I like the way Robert doubles some of the lines here. It's like he does it purposely just slightly off. Not trying to be perfect, and that looseness comes across in very cool way. Almost sounds like he's talking the lines in the background. Another neat aspect to this song is the way Jimmy lays back, allowing John Paul's piano to lead the way. So many guitarists have to be out in the front at all times, but Jimmy, always thinking of what is best for the SONG, does what is required here. This approach, not only on this song, but throughout the Zeppelin catalog, is another example of what set them apart from most other bands. Nobody steps on the other guys toes, and that mutual respect, for each other, and the song, is too often missed in music today.

        "And when the rhythm takes it,
         it feels so good, oh so good,
         Baby, if it keeps a shakin'
         it'll do you good, yeah so much good...

         With a little bit of, o' stop a shakin', shakin'
         and a little bit of, slide right down...
         whooo, just a little bit of sweet con-carne, yeah
         it makes me feel, makes me feel,
         got my feet on the ground..."

Jimmy takes off with a fuzzed out solo, showing his touch for a catchy "left of heaven" solo was still in tact. Jimmy really goes for it here, and the guitar lines, while brief, are very effective. His solo does everything a solo should, it lifts the song up, without taking away from anything, and then, just as quickly as he entered, he's gone, and it's back to the main riff.

Robert runs through another verse, and as we get to the closing section, he kicks into the "Sha na na na, sha na na na la" part. Sections like this and the outro on the "Ocean" are so cool, you just can't picture any other ROCK band doing these things. The fact that Zeppelin did do it, and could get away with it, reveals just how diverse the talent in the band was. And is. Always expect SOMETHING different from them.

This song has one of Robert's funniest lyrics ever in it. In the closing verse he sings: "And I'm so glad, so glad, so glad, so glad, and I'm good, oh so good". YES, Mr. modesty he ain't. But he's right you know, he IS good.

Zep never did perform this live in concert, but who knows what the future of Page/Plant may hold. One of only two songs that Zeppelin recorded that did not list Jimmy as a songwriter. This is a Jones/Plant collaboration. In Through The Outdoor has it's fans, and its detractors, but I have always admired this album, many good songs, and it showed the talents of John Paul Jones more, from writing, to playing, to arranging.

A fun, upbeat, happy, tap your foot kind of song, the perfect vehicle for getting psyched for Zepfest 1997! See ya soon...

Rock on,

Jeff

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